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More Unexplored Historical Pics

The first subway ride

Not much after the first flight in 1903, the US got its first subway in New York in 1904. George McClellan, the City’s mayor, opened it and even drove the first passengers on a track that was 9.1 miles long and had 28 stations. At the time, people saw it more as a circus act than a means of transportation. Talk about how times have changed.

Billy the Kid

When you are one of the most famous outlaws, you do anything to stay hidden. That is why there are only a couple of photos of the legendary Henry McCarthy, also known as William H. Bonney and most widely referred to as Billy the Kid. Not to mention that he was only 21 when Sheriff Pat Garret shot him in 1881, so it makes sense why Billy the Kid didn’t live a life long enough to have that many photos. Who w

ould’ve thought that he liked to play croquet?

James Dean and his Porsche

He was the Rebel Without a Cause, one of the first Hollywood hunks that became a cultural icon. James Dean may have played only in 3 movies, but his legacy is huge. This is his last photo before he went on a drive that eventually ended his life at the age of only 24. You could see in his smile that he had the lust for life, especially fast cars, like his beloved “Little Bastard”, a Porsche 550 Spyder.

Famous lion form the MGM opening credits

Recording Leo the Lion’s famous roar for MGM (Metro Goldwyn Mayer) Studios.

It is highly unlikely that there is a single person who’

s ever watched a movie that is not familiar with the famous roaring lion in the MGM’s opening credits. In fact, there were many lions during the y

ears used for the MGM logo. The one in the photo is Jackie, pictured during the sound recording in his cage, while the sound stage was built around it. Not sure how those two guys felt like in a cage with a wild Nubian lion.

The first photo ever

You might not think that this blurry image is a photo, but it is considered to be the oldest surviving photograph in existence. It was made by famous French photography pioneer Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826. It might not be what we call a photograph today, since it’s what you get when you remove the areas of a non-hardened asphalt from a pewter plate exposed to sunlight for eight hours. No wonder he did not take selfies.

John Lennon’s last photo

John Lennon signed an autograph to Mark David Chapman the same day that he later shot him in front of his New York residence. It was captured by an amateur photographer Paul Goresh. Chapman planned to murder Lennon for a long time and he finally did it on December 8, 1980. Apparently, he was angry with Lennon for claiming that the Beatles were more popular than Jesus, as well as for the lyrics to the songs “God” and “Imagine”. Chapman is still alive, serving his 20 years to life sentence.

 

 

source: https://www.illumeably.com/ic-article/unexplored-historical-pics/15/?utm_source=vsparks-de&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=vs-ww-a-ili-historical-e9-s-1&fbclid=IwAR2Y6B7uoBcPWR2lI9_ZPl0zryI0oLusgXgbSlj0pYfcQz-McoTHK7zjfUk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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